Posts by Jef


From the World Society On Uncommon Ground by Bert Chase, General Secretary

, November 24, 2020

Dear Members and Friends of the Anthroposophical Society in Canada, Every morning each of us enacts a remarkable ritual. We turn back our bedding, place our feet on the floor beside our bed, and stand to face the day. What we do not recognize is that this simple, yet significant process, is based on unrecognized expectations. We expect that the ground beneath our feet will support us. We expect that the relationships we had when we went to sleep will be there to meet us; our tasks in the world will remain unchanged. We trust the garment that gives our lives meaning will be there waiting for us, that we can put it on and, with it, have our orientation to a new day. Every day, whether we are conscious of it or not, each of us seeks for the firm ground of what has been. We look back...

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Interview with Micah Edelstein,  President, Anthroposophical Society in Canada Conducted by Geraldine Snowden and Robert McKay April 25, 2020

, November 21, 2020

This interview contains Micah’s personal thoughts, experiences and opinions and no part of the interview represent views or opinions of the Anthroposophical Society of Canada.  Since the interview was made, Micah has stepped down from the board of the South Shore Waldorf school to focus on building the next phase of the school.  Geraldine:  Micah, can you tell us a little bit about yourself, a bit of your biography? Micah:  Sure. I was born into a family that was already at the Toronto Waldorf School (TWS). Both my parents were active Anthroposophists and still are. My dad was teaching Biology and Woodwork and was also helping finish the building because the school had just been built and wasn’t completed yet. My mom was working in the kindergarten, then she joined the doctor’s clinic when it opened in Hesperus. She is trained in Germany as a doctor’s assistant and helped...

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The Importance of Branch and Group Life

, November 21, 2020

The Parzival Group in Kelowna BC   On many occasions, Rudolf Steiner pointed to branch/group life as a new form of sister-brotherhood. When individuals of different races, destinies, genders, professions, points of view come together periodically to study esoteric truths or do artistic activities or plan anthroposophical events, something can light up through the bonds of soul-to-soul. We can “awaken” to each other.  This work is valuable if we can work with others who think differently. We can train ourselves to give full recognition to them as authors of their own destinies. We can leave them free to structure their thoughts which are appropriate to them as the bearers of their pre-earthly existence. In branch life, we can learn to bow in reverence to the mystery of the other. Agitation kills anthroposophy, says Steiner. Our words must reflect not the propagandist’s attempt to persuade, but our pure and single-minded...

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Interview with Micah Edelstein, President, Anthroposophical Society in Canada Conducted by Geraldine Snowden and Robert McKay April 25, 2020

, October 12, 2020

This interview contains Micah’s personal thoughts, experiences and opinions and no part of the interview represent views or opinions of the Anthroposophical Society of Canada.  Since the interview was made, Micah has stepped down from the board of the South Shore Waldorf school to focus on building the next phase of the school.  Geraldine:  Micah, can you tell us a little bit about yourself, a bit of your biography? Micah:  Sure. I was born into a family that was already at the Toronto Waldorf School (TWS). Both my parents were active Anthroposophists and still are. My dad was teaching Biology and Woodwork and was also helping finish the building because the school had just been built and wasn’t completed yet. My mom was working in the kindergarten, then she joined the doctor’s clinic when it opened in Hesperus. She is trained in Germany as a doctor’s assistant and helped...

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Eulogy for Paul John Hodgkins by Rev. Jonah Evans

, June 29, 2020

Once, when Paul was asked to tell his autobiography, he answered: “Well…I was born at a very early age but I can’t remember a thing about it…” Paul John Hodgkins was born on January 31, 1947, in Wolverhampton near Birmingham, England, into a working class family. He had two brothers.  He described himself as being a dreamy child.  Although he didn’t like school very much, he completed his education at a quality Catholic boys’ school. His first job was for the British government in London. This didn’t last long, however, because at age 19 Paul was inspired to move to Canada together with a good friend. His Canadian life started in Red Lake ON with a job working in a gold mine. He made a lot of money. He spent a lot of money. But to Paul, neither money nor career were very interesting. Paul was not renowned for...

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